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Transformation of Sentences | ICSE and CBSE Boards Exercises, Rules PDF

Transformation of Sentences

To change the structure of the sentence, without changing in its sense is called Transformation Of Sentences. In this article, we will learn about Transformation of Sentences on the basis of Clauses. In every competitive examination, Transformation of Sentences is an important topic. Students need to practice well to score good marks in this section of exams. Transformation of Sentences can be done in various ways which are explained at the below section of this page. Candidates can download Transformation of Sentences Rules in PDF Form through this page. You can also check ICSE and CBSE Boards Exercises of Transformation of Sentences from here.

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Transformation of Sentences

What do Mean By Sentence?

Words are composed of meaningful combinations of characters. These meaningful words make meaningful and orderly combination of sentences. Sentences are the smallest unit of language, by which the meaning of the mind of the person writing or speaking is understood. In this way we can say that “The word group expressing the thoughts of man, which is systematic and can express full intention, is called a sentence.”

Explain Transformation Of Sentence

Transformation of a sentence means changing the form of a sentence without changing its meaning or sense. There are different methods of transforming sentences. Sentences can be classified into affirmative, negative, imperative, interrogative, assertive (declarative) and exclamatory sentences. These sentences can be transformed into different form without changing the meaning of the sentence. This process is known as transformation of sentences.

The transformation of a sentence is all about changing its form without altering its meaning. We can, for example, transform an exclamatory sentence into an assertive sentence or vice-versa. We can also transform simple sentences into complex or compound sentences. You can learn the rules of transformation of sentences here. There are three types of sentences that are Simple Sentences, Complex Sentences and Compound Sentences. But before this, Students need to understand about clauses.

What is Clause?

The clause is where there will be a subject and a predicate as a group of words, but that will not be considered as a full sentence. The clause can be of two types. Those are –

  1. Independent Clause:

A Clause that –

  • contains both a subject and a predicate.
  • can stand alone as a sentence or
  • can be a part of a multi-clause sentence.
  • uses conjunctions such as – or, for, nor, so, yet, and, but.

Example: We visited Agra, but we did not go to Taj Mahal.

  1. Dependent Clause:

A Clause that  is –

  • that have a subject and a predicate
  • cannot stand alone as a sentence
  • always be a part of a sentence, on which it depends for meaning.
  • A dependent clause is of three types:
    • Adjective Clause,
    • Adverb Clause, and
    • Noun Clause.
  1. Adjective Clause or Relative Clause:

An adjective clause or relative clause is like an adjective which comes before to change or modify the noun or pronoun by – who, which, that, where, when, whose, whom, whoever, etc.

Example:

  • This is a resort that we saw on the TV.
  • The Lady who was our tour guide is a American.
  1. Adverb Clause or Adverbial Clause:

An adverbial clause or subordinate clause is a type of dependent clause which starts with subordinating conjunctions like – because, although, when, if, until, as if etc.

Example:

  • The homeless guy spent the night on the road.
  • We wanted to go to the Bashundhara Cineplex.
  1. Noun Clause:

In a sentence when a clause functions as the complement, subject or object is called noun clause. It starts with the same words that begin adjective clauses, e.g., that, who, when, which, where, whether, why, how.

Example:

  • What we saw at the Thor movie was amazing.

Types Of Sentences

There are three types of sentences which are explained below:

  • Simple Sentence:

When in a sentence that has one independent clause it is called simple sentence.

Example: He confessed his illegal act.

  • Complex Sentence:

When in a sentence that has one clause and one or more subordinate clauses it is called a complex sentence.

Example: He confessed that he was guilty of his illegal act.

  • Compound Sentence:

When in a sentence that has more than one main clause it is called the compound sentence.

Example: I went to watch a movie named Justice League, but the movie was already houseful.

Rules of Transforming Simple Sentences into Complex Sentences

Rule: 1

“Present participle” in a simple sentence, to convert into complex sentences by adding “since/as/when” at the first half of the sentence.

  • Simple Sentence: Closing the door, I went back to school.
  • Complex Sentence: When I closed the door, I went back to school.

Rule: 2

“Being/ Verb+ing” in a simple sentence, to convert into a complex sentence by adding “as/when/since” at the first half of the sentence.

  • Simple Sentence: After winning a beauty contest she cried.
  • Complex Sentence: As she won the beauty contest, she cried.

Rule: 3

“Too…to” in a simple sentence, to convert into a complex sentence by adding “so…that (negative)”.

  • Simple Sentence: He is too weak to carry the box.
  • Complex Sentence: He is so weak that he cannot carry the box.

Rule: 4

“To” in the simple sentence, to convert into a complex sentence by adding “so that” in the sentence.

  • Simple Sentence: We eat to live.
  • Complex Sentence: We eat so that we can live.

Rule: 5

In the simple sentence “in spite of/ despite”, to convert into the complex sentence by adding “though/ although” in the sentence.

  • Simple Sentence: In spite of being rich, she is hard working.
  • Complex Sentence: Though she is rich, she is hard working.

Rule: 6

“Because of” in the simple sentence, to convert it to the complex sentence by adding “since” at the beginning of the sentence.

  • Simple Sentence: Because of his illness, he could not join the meeting.
  • Complex Sentence: Since he was ill, he could not join the meeting.

Rule: 7

“Subject + verb + object + present participle” type of simple sentence, to convert it to the complex sentence by “subject + verb + object + relative pronoun of the object + be verb according to relative pronoun and tense + rest of the sentence”.

  • Simple Sentence: I saw a bird flying.
  • Complex Sentence: I saw a bird which was flying.

Rule: 8

In the simple sentence starts with “without”,  by adding “if/ in case” is converted into the complex sentence.

  • Simple Sentence: Without adding the sugar the dish will taste bad.
  • Complex Sentence: If you do not add sugar the dish will taste bad.

Rule: 9

In the simple sentence “at the time” will be converted into “when” in the complex sentence.

  • Simple Sentence: She woke up at the time of load shedding.
  • Complex Sentence: She woke up when it was load shedding.

Rule: 10

In the simple sentence, “adjective” will be converted into “that/which” in the complex sentence.

  • Simple Sentence: It was a blue shirt.
  • Complex Sentence: It was a shirt which was blue.

Download Rules of Transformation Of Sentences PDF

Exercise For Sentences Related Questions

Identify the following sentences by choosing (a) simple, (b) compound or (c) complex:

Ques1. Either the bus starts, or we will remain here all day.

(a) simple

(b) compound

(c) complex

Answer: (b) compound

Ques2. A group of students studied the problem and solved it in a few minutes.

(a) simple

(b) compound

(c) complex

Answer: (a) simple

Ques3. The crew checked the ship and prepared it for sea.

(a) simple

(b) compound

(c) complex

Answer: (a) simple

Ques4. When bacteria is resistant to antibiotics, the only option may be to remove the infection with surgery.

(a) simple

(b) compound

(c) complex

Answer: (c) complex

Ques5. The bike was fairly operational, but the condition of the body was poor.

(a) simple

(b) compound

(c) complex

Answer: (b) compound

Convert The Following Simple Sentences Into Complex Sentences:

Ques1. A content man is always happy.

Answer: A man who is content is always happy.

Ques2. I worked hard to pass the examination.

Answer: I worked so hard that I might pass the examination.

Ques3. We read to learn.

Answer: We read so that we can learn.

Ques4. Despite being poor he is honest.

Answer: Though he is poor he is honest.

Ques5. I saw a wounded dog today.

Answer: I saw a dog today that was wounded.

Transformation of Sentences – ICSE and CBSE Boards Exercises                   

Ques1. Opening the door, he asked for my permission to come in. (Make it complex)

  1. He opened the door and asked for my permission to come in.
  2. After opening the door, he asked for my permission to come in.
  3. As he opened the door, he asked for my permission to come in.
  4. He asked for my permission while opening the door.

Answer: Option 3

Explanation:

The first portion of the sentence can be considered as a dependent clause and the second portion can be considered as an independent clause which makes it a complex sentence.

Ques2. He works at night so that he can study at day. (Make it simple)

  1. He works at night and studies at day.
  2. As he studies at day, so he works at night.
  3. As he studies at day, so he works at night.
  4. He works at night to study at day.

Answer: Option 4

Explanation:

There is not more than one clause in the selected sentence. So it is a simple sentence.

Ques3. As her father died, she became helpless. (Make it compound)

  1. Her father died and she became helpless.
  2. She became helpless when her father died.
  3. Her fathers’ death made her helpless.
  4. Her father died, so she became helpless.

Answer: Option 1

Explanation:

Two independent clauses are connected by ‘and’ in the selected sentence. So it is a compound sentence.

Ques4. They tried hard to win the match. (Make it complex)

  1. They tried hard and they won the match.
  2. They tried hard so that they can win the match.
  3. They tried so hard to win the match.
  4. They tried to win the match by trying hard.

Answer: Option 2

Explanation:

There’s a dependent clause and an independent clause in the selected sentence. So it is a complex sentence.

Ques5. He went to the shop but he didn’t buy anything. (Make it complex)

  1. Although he went to the shop, he didn’t buy anything.
  2. He bought nothing after going to the shop.
  3. He went to the shop only to return empty-handed.
  4. He went to the shop but bought nothing.

Answer: Option 1

Explanation:

There’s an independent clause and a dependent clause in the selected sentence. So it is a complex sentence.

Ques6. We avoided that restaurant because of its bad reputation. (Make it compound)

  1. Since that restaurant had a bad reputation, we avoided it.
  2. That restaurant had a bad reputation and we avoided it.
  3. We had to avoid that restaurant as it had a bad reputation.
  4. That restaurant had a bad reputation for which we had to avoid it.

Answer: Option 2

Explanation: Two independent clauses are connected by ‘and’ in the selected sentence. So it is a compound sentence.

Ques7. You have to pay or you cannot leave this place. (Make it simple)

  1. You cannot leave this place without paying.
  2. If you want to leave this place, then you have to pay.
  3. You can leave this place only if you pay.
  4. Unless you pay, you cannot leave this place.

Answer: Option 1

Explanation:

There’s not more than one clause in the selected sentence. So it is a simple sentence.

Ques8. Despite trying hard, he failed to fulfill the target. (Make it Compound)

  1. Although he tried hard, he failed to fulfill the target.
  2. He failed to fulfill the target even though he tried hard.
  3. In spite of trying hard, he failed to fulfill the target.
  4. He tried hard but he failed to fulfill the target.

Answer: Option 4

Explanation:

Both the independent clauses are connected by ‘but’ in the selected sentence. So it is a compound sentence.

Ques9. Though she knew what would happen, she did it anyway. (Make it compound)

  1. She did it despite knowing what would happen.
  2. She knew what would happen as she did it.
  3. She knew what would happen but she did it anyway.
  4. She did it even though she knew what would happen.

Answer: Option 3

Explanation:

Both independent clauses are connected by ‘but’ in the selected sentence. So it is a compound sentence.

 Ques10. He is so sick that he cannot speak. (Make it simple)

  1. He is too sick to speak.
  2. He is sick, so he cannot speak.
  3. As he is sick, so he cannot speak.
  4. He is sick and he cannot speak.

Answer: Option 1

Explanation:

There’s not more than one clause in the selected sentence. So it is a simple sentence.

Note:

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